Record high superconductivity near 254 Kelvin, -19C, -2F

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DeltaV
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Record high superconductivity near 254 Kelvin, -19C, -2F

Postby DeltaV » Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:49 pm

10 October 2009
Superconductors.ORG

"Superconductors.ORG herein reports the observation of record high superconductivity near 254 Kelvin (-19C, -2F). This temperature critical (Tc) is believed accurate +/- 2 degrees, making this the first material to enter a superconductive state at temperatures commonly found in household freezers..."

"...The host compound has the formula (Tl4Ba)Ba2Ca2Cu7Oy and is believed to attain 254K superconductivity when a 9223 structure forms... "

"...The volume fraction of this material is very low. Before commercialization is possible, a refinement method will need to be developed to increase the VF. As a result of a low VF, numerous R-T and magnetization tests may be necessary to see the respective transitions above the noise. This discovery is being released into the public domain without patent protection in order to encourage additional research."

Those who did well in chemistry class, start cooking!

kunkmiester
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Postby kunkmiester » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:17 pm

How low can a conventional refrigeration system go? I'm thinking of a simple practical limit. No one is going to even have a liquid nitrogen generator in their house/office, so a smallish self contained unit would be the limit for household and small office use. It would also be less complex, and therefore cheaper. When you can stick a cryogenic supercomputer with cooling system in a box the size of a small fridge, you can start using it for commercial and industrial purposes--provided of course, that you can sell it cheap enough.
Evil is evil, no matter how small

nextbigfuture
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Good ultralow lab freezers go to about -86C.

Postby nextbigfuture » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:35 pm

Lab freezers
http://www.bio-equip.cn/enshow1equip.as ... ision=1001

Subzero freezers (kitchens
http://www.boxappliance.com/Parts/Setti ... tures.html
FREEZER compartment temperatures can be set from -5°F to +5°F. Pretty easily maintained.

Dedicated commercial freezer
http://www.acitydiscount.com/True-Manuf ... 23.1.1.htm

Extra large evaporator coil balanced with higher horsepower compressor and large condenser; maintains -10°F (-23.3°C). Ideal for both frozen foods and ice cream. Can go a bit cooler. Pretty easy to go to -40F or -50F.

Some confirmation of Joe Ecks work with YCBO compounds
http://nextbigfuture.com/2009/10/confir ... -ycbo.html

Joe Ecks work seems carefully done but he has been a one man show. that a small University is doing some confirmation and getting a journal article is good.

Path to metallic hydrogen looks easier
http://nextbigfuture.com/2009/10/lithiu ... allic.html

Metallic hydrogen could mean room temp superconductors too.

chrismb
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Postby chrismb » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:42 pm

Doesn't sound, or look, like it'll form a very stable and uniform phase, but it's all development in the right direction.

kurt9
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Postby kurt9 » Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:06 pm

What is the maximum current flux this material can handle (Amp/cm2)? The superconductivity of some of these materials breaks down beyond a certain flux. It should be obvious what application comes to mind for this material.

DeltaV
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Postby DeltaV » Tue Oct 13, 2009 1:01 am

I'd guess the current density might be comparable to existing cuprate superconductors, but that's only a guess.

Re Lithium Hydride:

"The calculations also predict that LiH6 could be a metal at normal pressures. However, under these conditions it is not stable and would decompose to form LiH and H2.

The stable and metallic LiH6 compound is predicted to form around 1 million atmospheres, which is around 25 percent of the pressure required to metalize hydrogen by itself," said Eva Zurek, lead author of the paper and an assistant professor of chemistry at The State University of New York, Buffalo."

If a way can be found to safely stabilize it at 1 (or 0) atm pressure, then I'm for it.

TallDave
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Postby TallDave » Tue Oct 13, 2009 2:41 am

You're not keeping an open mind. We could also move to Jupiter.

pfrit
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Postby pfrit » Tue Oct 13, 2009 3:12 am

To my eyes, Joe ecks is not a nut job. But remember that he is only identifing curie temp transformations. What the graphs show are tiny islands of material in a matrix of failed material. The next step would be to purify the superconducting elements. This is no small task. His work seems very impressive, but identifing the material properties of the islands is a very large task. Very thought provoking.
What is the difference between ignorance and apathy? I don't know and I don't care.

D Tibbets
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Postby D Tibbets » Tue Oct 13, 2009 12:12 pm

TallDave wrote:You're not keeping an open mind. We could also move to Jupiter.



I'll modify that: We could all move to the core of Jupiter.

Released to the public domain- either the researchers are generous, or they realize that there is no real possibility of a pratical application.
Hmm, wihich is harder to maintain - a superconducter at cryogenic temperatures and 1 atmosphere of pressure, or a super conducter at room temperature and 1,000,000 atmospheres of pressure? Let me guess...

Dan Tibbets
To error is human... and I'm very human.

kurt9
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Postby kurt9 » Tue Oct 13, 2009 3:51 pm

LN2 cooling is no big deal. LN2 is cheaper than milk on a volume basis, with many companies supplying it. You can even buy your own compressor and make it yourself. In some ways LN2 cooling is superior to active refrigeration because it does not require active refrigeration. You just have to top-off the LN2 from time to time.

KitemanSA
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Postby KitemanSA » Tue Oct 13, 2009 3:55 pm

kurt9 wrote: In some ways LN2 cooling is superior to active refrigeration because it does not require active refrigeration. You just have to top-off the LN2 from time to time.
Which requires active refrigeration, somewhere!

deane
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Postby deane » Wed Oct 14, 2009 7:49 am

D Tibbets wrote:Released to the public domain- either the researchers are generous, or they realize that there is no real possibility of a pratical application.


I had an email exchange with Joe a while back, discussing why no other experimenters were picking up on his work, given how much further he is up the Tc curve.

He was as puzzled as I, but one of the reasons he offered up was that he'd patented some of his earlier compounds and techniques and, as a result of that, others might think it difficult to make a buck off of it.

I think that releasing it to the public domain is an attempt on Joe's part to get other researchers to take a look at his results.

D Tibbets
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Postby D Tibbets » Wed Oct 14, 2009 3:35 pm

deane wrote:
D Tibbets wrote:Released to the public domain- either the researchers are generous, or they realize that there is no real possibility of a pratical application.


I had an email exchange with Joe a while back, discussing why no other experimenters were picking up on his work, given how much further he is up the Tc curve.

He was as puzzled as I, but one of the reasons he offered up was that he'd patented some of his earlier compounds and techniques and, as a result of that, others might think it difficult to make a buck off of it.

I think that releasing it to the public domain is an attempt on Joe's part to get other researchers to take a look at his results.


I should probably qualify my pessimism concerning extreamly high pressure super conducters. Obvously (?), these extream conditions can be achieved in the laboratory if they have actually created these compunds (not just computer models). But I have not heard of any that are stable much below these extream pressures once formed (unlike for instance- diamonds). I'm guessing that stability at several orders of magnitude lower pressures would have to be achieved to even begin to consider pratical applications. Perhaps thier continued efforts and understanding may eventually lead to this, but the challenges seem formidable, with needed gains being proportionatly much greater than those associated with cryogenic super conductors, which already have pratical products at liquid helium and liquid nitrogen (?) temperatures.

At least that is my 2 cents worth; or, concidering my expertise in this field, my 1/4th cent worth (even after taking into account inflation). :?

Dan Tibbets
To error is human... and I'm very human.

MSimon
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Postby MSimon » Mon Oct 19, 2009 11:09 am

This is no sure thing. The Tc reported may only be evidenced in "islands". If that is the case - no immediate uses are obvious.

A link:

http://superconductors.org/254K.htm
Engineering is the art of making what you want from what you can get at a profit.


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