That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Point out news stories, on the net or in mainstream media, related to polywell fusion.

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Skipjack
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That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby Skipjack » Thu Oct 10, 2019 6:57 pm

That's the same Navy- guy who had those other recent Navy- patents (high temperature super conductors and anti gravity thingy) published recently.
Looks like a fusor with rotating(?) grid of sorts...
Not sure this is any good, but with the lack of news lately...
https://patents.google.com/patent/US201 ... atore+Pais)

RERT
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby RERT » Fri Oct 11, 2019 10:12 am

Salvatore - Saviour
Pais - Country

pbelter
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby pbelter » Fri Oct 11, 2019 7:40 pm

Nice find! I really wonder if there is any substance behind those patents

Skipjack
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby Skipjack » Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:28 pm

pbelter wrote:Nice find! I really wonder if there is any substance behind those patents

Allegedly, the Navy has been pushing them through, even though at least some of them were rejected in the initial patent application. That said, I have my doubts about them.

Giorgio
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby Giorgio » Sun Oct 13, 2019 5:42 am

RERT wrote:Salvatore - Saviour
Pais - Country


His actual name is Salvatore Cezar Pais.

Salvatore (Italian for) Saviour
Cezar (Romanian for) Caesar
Pais (French for) Country

So here you have, "Caesar saviour (of the) country". Quite a pompous name!

That said, considering the total lack of any new scientific proof that he submitted in the applications, I doubt that his patents can even break even with the cost of the paper needed to submit them, let alone save a country.

US should really consider to reform their patent system as now it has become quite meaningless
A society of dogmas is a dead society.

kunkmiester
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby kunkmiester » Fri Oct 18, 2019 1:32 am

Evil is evil, no matter how small

Giorgio
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby Giorgio » Fri Oct 18, 2019 2:39 am

Yes.
A society of dogmas is a dead society.

williatw
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby williatw » Wed Oct 30, 2019 7:01 pm

A Breakthrough In American Energy Dominance? U.S. Navy Patents Compact Fusion Reactor


By Ariel Cohen

Image
The USS Enterprise with Einstein’s mass-energy equivalence on its flight deck USN



President Donald Trump’s energy dominance narrative – fueled by the prolific production of oil and gas from America’s Shale Gale – recently got a boost from the United States Navy. The US Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division filed a patent for a compact fusion reactor (CFR) last month, one that claims to improve upon the shortcomings of the Lockheed Martin Skunkworks CFR that uses similar “plasma confinement” technology.

The man behind the state-of-the-art design is US Navy researcher Salvatore Cezar Pais, who received major publicity for patenting room-temperature superconductors and a suspiciously UFO-like aircraft that uses “anti-gravity” technology.


If it sounds like science fiction, that’s because it sort of is.


Nuclear fusion, the reaction that powers the sun, has been the elusive dream of the scientific community for decades. Theoretically, a fusion power plant would be able to produce near limitless amounts of clean, safe energy from a small amount of electricity and a handful of hydrogen isotopes.

A fusion reaction is impossible to replicate in its perfect form because laboratory conditions cannot recreate the gravitational force of a star, but that hasn’t stopped scientists from trying. The US Navy patent claims that it can achieve these enormous amounts of energy in a compact device through the use of spinning dynamic fusors – plasma containment devices – which keep nuclear plasma stable in a way that mimics the mass of the sun.

Image
Official patent of Salvatore Pais’ design showing conical dynamic fusors around vacuum core

The patent also states that the resulting fusion reaction would produce a net energy gain (more energy emitted than enters the system), which would be an unprecedented first for manmade fusion reactors.

Theoretically, Pais’ concept could produce upwards of one gigawatt (one billion watts) to 1 terawatt (one trillion watts) of power from just a megawatt (one million watts) of energy input. For reference, a large nuclear power plant produces around 1 gigawatt of power, enough to supply some 700,000 American homes.

If it works, the Navy patented CFR could replace the fission nuclear reactors used in almost 150 naval vessels – most of which operate under the 100 MW range. In fact, a CFR the size of a small car could be utilized in any peaceful or wartime scenario where energy is needed, from ships to jets to tanks to remote military bases.

It is no wonder, then, that the US Naval patent claim has come under scrutiny from the scientific community, especially given that the device only measures 0.3 to 2 meters in diameter. Instead of using superconducting magnets in larger, more traditional fusion plants, Pais’ design uses conical dynamic fusors that spin at extremely high speeds to produce a sustained, concentrated magnetic flux that could in theory sustain the plasma state needed for power production. This powerful magnetic flux then compresses an isotopic hydrogen gas mixture to form a plasma core in the vacuum chamber, which can achieve temperatures high enough to achieve true fusion with breakeven energy.

Achieving an energy gain at all, much less from a compact device, would be an enormous achievement not just for the US Navy, but for the entire planet. It would be a technological revolution similar to the discovery of coal-based steam engine and the gasoline-powered internal combustion engine, only with orders of magnitude more energy. It would also be safe and emissions free.


And while fusion has been called a technology that is “always going to be thirty years away”, the threat of climate change has increased the impetus to achieve success. Energy giant Eni SpA recently invested a $50 million towards Commonwealth Fusion Systems, a company founded by six MIT professors. Billionaires Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates are backing Breakthrough Energy Ventures, a group committed to funding nuclear fusion research.

Fusion occurs at temperatures exceeding 15 million degrees Celsius, which can only be achieved by feeding fuel (unstable isotopes like uranium and deuterium) into a plasma field. The Soviet Union provided the initial blueprint for achieving nuclear fusion through plasma with the first Tokamak reactor, which was ultimately unable to sustain fusion conditions for more than a few seconds.

Today a number of such tokamak fusion projects exist around the world. China is working on its China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) to become operational in the 2020s, and South Korea has its KSTAR project, a tokamak which reached a record 70 seconds of plasma operation.

The largest project by far, however, is the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) which is a collaboration of the EU, India, Japan, China, South Korea and the United States. ITER is a massive fusion reactor facility that aims to produce around 500 MW of fusion energy when complete with an input of only 50 MW – ten times its energy input as opposed to the millions-fold increase in the Navy CFR. The ITER project represents the international commitment to finding alternative clean energy in the face of climate change.


Image
International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor currently under construction
ITER



It is unclear whether this patent represents a monumental scientific breakthrough. Some even said that this may be a disinformation operation, an attempt to divert America’s peer competitors to pursue a technological dead end.

What is certain is that nuclear fusion technology development is gathering pace. While the Navy’s design may not be immediately operational (or even realistic), a major shift towards harnessing clean fusion energy is already on the horizon.

All the better if the United States harnesses it first.



https://www.forbes.com/sites/arielcohen ... 639b521070

Skipjack
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby Skipjack » Wed Oct 30, 2019 11:22 pm

Wake me up when they are producing neutrons...

krenshala
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby krenshala » Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:21 pm

Fusion occurs at temperatures exceeding 15 million degrees Celsius, which can only be achieved by feeding fuel (unstable isotopes like uranium and deuterium) into a plasma field. The Soviet Union provided the initial blueprint for achieving nuclear fusion through plasma with the first Tokamak reactor, which was ultimately unable to sustain fusion conditions for more than a few seconds.


There is so much wrong with the above paragraph from the article... I wonder what would happen if you mixed unstable isotopes of uranium and deuterium in a high magnetic/plasma field?

And while the USSR did come up with the tokamak, that was by no means "the initial blueprint" for fusors. I guess the author never heard from Farnsworth or Hirsh, or the other US researchers?

paperburn1
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby paperburn1 » Tue Nov 05, 2019 4:12 am

Also sounds like he is quoting some old gas core rocket fusion fission rocket stuff there as well.
I am not a nuclear physicist, but play one on the internet.

choff
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Re: That Salvatore Pais again... Fusion Reactor Patent

Postby choff » Tue Nov 05, 2019 6:27 am

The Pais design looks a little bit like Nebel's new design with all the rotation. So, if it were possible to take the Polywell design, and cause the magrids to spin at a high speed, you could conceivably attain both high temperatures in the plasma and a high beta magnetic field via induction. Nebel's own design does this and includes a POPs cycle if I'm not incorrect. You might not even need the heavy duty plasma injection to startup the wiffleball configuration. It might give the design that icing on the cake boost that makes break even in a compact configuration plausible. Either that or the rotation causes the plasma to scatter and you get nothing.
CHoff


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