Polywell Investment

Discuss funding sources for polywell research, including the non-profit EMC2 Fusion Development Corporation, as well as any other relevant research efforts.

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djolds1
Posts: 1296
Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 8:03 am

Polywell Investment

Post by djolds1 »

Is there an investment fund for Polywell? Something that would allow supporters to contribute $50 or more per month to buy into it? Or would that just consist of buying EMC2 stock? Given their funding constraints, and the promising nature of the technology, and the degree to which it's becoming known (at least in the geek community), some sort of revenue generating program that doesn't depend on big donors should be feasible.

Jason B.
Vae Victis

bobshipp
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Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 3:28 am
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Post by bobshipp »

Yes there is. Go to www.emc2fusion.org and hit New Mexico Community Foundation.

KitemanSA
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Location: OlyPen WA

Post by KitemanSA »

bobshipp wrote:Yes there is. Go to www.emc2fusion.org and hit New Mexico Community Foundation.
This is a gift, not an investment. Like DJ, I would like to INVEST.

KitemanSA
Posts: 6114
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Location: OlyPen WA

Post by KitemanSA »

Anyone ever started an "Investment Club"?

Wittgenstein
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu May 15, 2008 3:54 pm
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Investment

Post by Wittgenstein »

I for one would be willing to make a sizeable (for me) investment. Unfortunately, my means are several orders of magnitude less than what is required. However, I am certain there are many, many others who would be more than slightly interested in investing. Ventures with far lower potential payoff and lower probability of success have been able to raise more money than is required here.

Heck, Steorn managed to find investors willing to kick in (quite a few million euros, if memory serves) for a free energy scheme.

The problem with the community foundation thing is this: it is a donation, not an investment. If polywell technology is guaranteed to be made available to the world as a not-for-profit venture, then I'd be game to make a not-for-profit investment (i.e. a donation.) But I suspect that GE (or whoever) will not be building polywell power plants at cost as a commnity service.

It's hard to justify making a donation to other investors' profits. If one risks investment capital, one generally expects to receive the return on that capital.

DeltaV
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Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:05 am

Post by DeltaV »

3+ years on:

Any new developments regarding EMC2 investment opportunities?

zapkitty
Posts: 267
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:13 pm

Post by zapkitty »

DeltaV wrote:3+ years on:

Any new developments regarding EMC2 investment opportunities?
If you're not an accredited investor then you'll pretty much have to wait for the JOBS Act crowdfunding provisions to kick in.

The Jumpstart Obama's Bucket Shops Act will be in regulatory review until early 2013. After that crowdfunding investment portals should open up very quickly.

(... also, every retired senior citizen in America will have a target painted on their backs with Wall St. taking aim...)

In addition, EMC2 will have to devise and implement its own methods of dealing with such investment sources.

DeltaV
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Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:05 am

Post by DeltaV »

I was hoping some BDC has gotten involved with EMC2.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_D ... nt_Company
BDCs are similar to venture capital (VC) or private equity (PE) funds since they provide investors with a way to invest in small companies and participate in the sale of those investments. However, VC and PE funds are often closed to all but wealthy investors. BDCs, on the other hand, allow anyone who purchases a share to participate in the open market. This feature often attracts money to newly public BDCs, thereby giving them a faster way to raise capital for investments than VC funds, which are generally closed end funds created by wealthy investors.

zapkitty
Posts: 267
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:13 pm

Post by zapkitty »

DeltaV wrote:I was hoping some BDC has gotten involved with EMC2.
As I understand it you can't just invest in EMC2 via a BDC.

You'll actually invest in the BDC and therefore in everything else the company is invested in.

Which would be great for a hypothetical BDC named Aneutronic Startup Development Fund Inc. which would be invested solely in EMC2, LPP and Tri-Alpha.

But it wouldn't be so good with a BDC named General Energy Futures Inc. which could be invested in EMC2... and Leonardo... and BLP... and Investor Rental Mortgage CDOs...

Potluck, really. and no way to invest just in EMC2.

mattman
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue May 27, 2008 11:14 pm

Post by mattman »

Well, if there is investment, I am willing to work.

I have 4+ years of Polywell Research Experience.

polywellfan
Posts: 33
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:05 pm

Post by polywellfan »

zapkitty wrote:
DeltaV wrote:I was hoping some BDC has gotten involved with EMC2.
Which would be great for a hypothetical BDC named Aneutronic Startup Development Fund Inc. which would be invested solely in EMC2, LPP and Tri-Alpha.
Ok, who can help to make Aneutronic Startup Development Fund Inc. reality? Is it necessary to establish it in the US under US-law or can it be established under European law?

Feebleminded
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2012 6:26 pm

Post by Feebleminded »

You could also setup an Employee Securities Company (ESC) where fusion enthusiasts could be investor/employees, but you would be limited. Granted, the Crowd Funding SEC regulation will only allow $1M in investment.

http://www.debevoise.com/newseventspubs ... 150c3bb8f2
An ESC would become subject to Section 12(g) if it had more than 500 investors and more than $10 million of assets at the end of any fiscal year.

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