Factor X have we finally found the fountain of Youth?

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williatw
Posts: 1752
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Factor X have we finally found the fountain of Youth?

Postby williatw » Fri Mar 08, 2019 2:53 pm

Diogenes wrote:I just wish to say I appreciate your effort in posting this information in here.


Thank you! Hard to believe I have been posting these items here in this particular category for 7 Years?! Just doesn't seem that long somehow but that's what the date on my first post works out to; my how time flies...

williatw
Posts: 1752
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Factor X have we finally found the fountain of Youth?

Postby williatw » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:28 pm

Adult Stem Cells Now the ‘Gold Standard’
By Wesley J. Smith March 15, 2019 2:40 PM


Image
(Luisa Gonzalez/REUTERS)

Peer-reviewed, published successful results abound, with numerous papers now documenting therapeutic benefit in clinical trials and progress toward fully tested and approved treatments. Phase I/II trials suggest potential cardiovascular benefit from bone marrow–derived adult stem cells and umbilical cord blood–derived cells

The superiority of adult stem cells in the clinic and the mounting evidence supporting their effectiveness in regeneration and repair make adult stem cells the gold standard of stem cells for patients.



During the Great Embryonic Stem Cell Debate, circa 2001-2008, I watched “the scientists” blatantly lie about the supposedly low potential for adult stem cells and the CURES! CURES! CURES that were just around the corner from embryonic stem cells. You remember: Children would soon be out of their wheelchairs and Uncle Ernie’s Parkinson’s would soon be a disease of the past. The pro-ESCR campaign was filled with so much disinformation and hype — willingly swallowed by an in-the-tank media — all in a corrupt attempt to overturn the minor federal funding restrictions over ESCR imposed by the president, and to hurt President Bush politically.

After the Bush presidency, the issue became quiescent. And now, it turns out that the clinical advances that have been made are not from embryonic stem cells.

During the debate, David A. Prentice — a stem-cell researcher and my good friend — took a sabbatical from his Indiana State University professorship to tout the great potential of adult stem cells (and to oppose human cloning) around the world. He became quite prominent in the debate — for which he was punished by his university’s administration. For example, despite receiving teaching awards, he was moved from graduate classes and his lab privileges were curtailed.

Prentice eventually headed for The Swamp to continue his advocacy. He is now with the Charlotte Lozier Institute, where he has continued to track and educate about stem-cell science and engage policy controversies. Prentice just published a major peer-reviewed article in the science journal Circulation Research, in which he details the amazing successes of adult stem-cell research — demonstrating that the ESCR hypers had it wrong and he had it right. Prentice outlines the many problems that make embryonic stem cells “ill suited for clinical use,” including the difficulty of “differentiating and integrating” ES cells into the body, the problem that these cells “have shown evidence of causing arrhythmia,” the potential to cause tumors, and “immunogenicity,” in real people’s language, rejection caused by triggering the body’s immune response.

In contrast, ethical stem cells have had excellent successes. For example, “induced pluripotent stem cells,” which can be made from normal skin cells, are splendid for use in cell modeling and drug testing.

But Prentice’s primary focus is on adult stem cells, often taken from donor bone marrow or a patient’s own body. They have also not advanced as fast as was hoped, but they are progressing into clinical uses and human studies. From, “Adult Stem Cells:”


Not only do adult stem cells carry no ethical baggage regarding their isolation, their practical advantages over pluripotent stem cells have led to many current clinical trials, as well as some therapies approved through all phases of Food and Drug Administration testing.

Peer-reviewed, published successful results abound, with numerous papers now documenting therapeutic benefit in clinical trials and progress toward fully tested and approved treatments. Phase I/II trials suggest potential cardiovascular benefit from bone marrow–derived adult stem cells and umbilical cord blood–derived cells.

Striking results have been reported using adult stem cells to treat neurological conditions, including chronic stroke. Positive long-term progression-free outcomes have been seen, including some remission, for multiple sclerosis, as well as benefits in early trials for patients with type I diabetes mellitus and spinal cord injury. And adult stem cells are starting to be used as vehicles for genetic therapies, such as for epidermolysis bullosa.

If this progress had been derived from embryonic stem cells, the headlines would have been deafening. The cheering from the media would include anchors dancing with pom-poms! But the media isn’t much interested in reporting adult stem-cell successes prominently because doing so doesn’t promote favored ideological agendas. That’s not good journalism.

Prentice concludes:

The superiority of adult stem cells in the clinic and the mounting evidence supporting their effectiveness in regeneration and repair make adult stem cells the gold standard of stem cells for patients.

That’s excellent news for everyone, and may it continue.

But as we benefit from these ethical treatments, the next time ideologically driven scientists, bioethicists, and their media water carriers seek to drive public opinion on scientific issues in a partisan direction by deploying the propaganda tools of hype, exaggeration, and castigation of those who espouse heterodox views, remember how the Great Stem Cell Debate turned out.




https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/a ... -standard/

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10 ... 118.313664

williatw
Posts: 1752
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Factor X have we finally found the fountain of Youth?

Postby williatw » Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:52 pm

Delivery of 45 Age Reversing Gene Therapies at Once is Under Peer Review

Brian Wang | January 12, 2019




Image

George Church revealed progress on aging reversal using gene therapies. They have delivered 45 gene therapies to provide aging reversal. They find the combined treatment is effective against obesity, diabetes, osteoarthritis, cardiac damage and kidney disease.

At 32:00-33:30 minutes George Church specifically describes delivering 45 age reversing gene therapies to treat multiple age related diseases.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0HMp3YYosI

Rejuvenate Bio has been using the aging reversal therapies on dogs for almost all of 2018.

George Church expects to get the treatment to people around 2025.

George gave eight examples of aging reversal that have been published and reported by various researchers. Some researchers have used small molecules and others used other methods.

He wanted to show that these are real treatments that dramatically reverse aging damage.

Effective treatment and reversal of obesity, diabetes, cardiac, arthritis and kidney damage could boost the lifespan of many people and make 90-95 life expectancy possible. Fixing all aging damage would put us toward a path of extreme longevity.





https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2019/01/d ... eview.html

kurt9
Posts: 551
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 4:14 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon, USA

Re: Factor X have we finally found the fountain of Youth?

Postby kurt9 » Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:29 pm

You guys are behind the curve with regards to the adult stem cell and iPSC thing.

Do an internet search on "invivo cellular reprogramming" and you'll see where this stuff is going.

williatw
Posts: 1752
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:15 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Factor X have we finally found the fountain of Youth?

Postby williatw » Thu Mar 21, 2019 9:49 pm

More from Bill Andrews:

Chatting with Multimillionaire Molecular Biologist Dr.Bill Andrews


Published on Mar 7, 2019


“Bill Andrews, Ph.D., its founder and CEO, is a scientist, athlete and executive who is known for pushing the envelope and for challenging convention. Featured in numerous publications, TV shows and documentaries on the topic of life extension, Bill Andrews is one of the principal discoverers of both the RNA and protein components of human telomerase, and was awarded 2nd place as National Inventor of the Year in 1997.He earned his Ph.D. in Molecular and Population Genetics at the University of Georgia in 1981 and served as Senior Scientist at Armos Corporation and Codon Corporation, as Molecular Biology Director at Berlex Biosciences and Geron Corporation as well as Director of Technology Development at EOS Biosciences. On top of his in-depth experience, Bill is also the inventor of 50+ U.S. Patents issued on telomerase and author of numerous scientific research studies published in peer reviewed scientific journals. “ (Sierra Sciences)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aua5NC_ztnw

To the time constrained; he mentions toward the beginning that the previously mentioned first trial of his (Telomerase therapy) on an Alzheimer’s patient has been pushed back until first of May or so of this year. More delays not surprising from him at this point, however something hopeful on a related front. At around 07:41 in the clip he says the treatment would cost around 400K; this is considerably cheaper he says then the 3 million he was saying it would have caused some months ago. According to him they have made great progress in lowering cost; not that much more expensive at this point then what we do now to treat the diseases of aging. How much does cancer/heart disease/Alzheimer’s treatments cost in aggregate over a lifetime now? To say nothing of nursing home care? And you end up dying anyway? Versus 400K to make you young/healthy/continually working tax paying again. And that is even assuming no economies of scale to lower costs further once production is ratcheted up.


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