Liquid semiconductors

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ohiovr
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Liquid semiconductors

Post by ohiovr »

Nuclear batteries don't do very well for a number of reasons one of them I'm told is that high energy nuclear particles tend to destroy crystal lattices. Would there be any benefit to using a liquid semiconductor junction since there are no lattices to destroy? Just thinking about liquid batteries which is what I blame for this idea.

paperburn1
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Re: Liquid semiconductors

Post by paperburn1 »

Your a man ahead of his time

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep05249

http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2 ... ar-battery

The researchers hope to get around that problem by using a liquid semiconductor rather than a solid semiconductor. Eventually they also want to boost battery power, shrink its size, and eventually end up with a battery thinner than a human hair.
I am not a nuclear physicist, but play one on the internet.

ohiovr
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Re: Liquid semiconductors

Post by ohiovr »

No new ideas under the sun lol :mrgreen:

paperburn1
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Re: Liquid semiconductors

Post by paperburn1 »

Well at least your idea shows promise , mine usually run foul because of physics or law enforcement :D
I am not a nuclear physicist, but play one on the internet.

ohiovr
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Re: Liquid semiconductors

Post by ohiovr »

Actually the idea I got now is probably going to cause me trouble too :mrgreen:

Ever heard of this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelvin_water_dropper

There are several videos on it on youtube. I made one also:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6cgD3HTpWw

Tom Ligon
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Re: Liquid semiconductors

Post by Tom Ligon »

This makes me recall something that was under development back in the late 60's, but seems to have fizzled: microfluidics. They were making small-scale fluidic gates (elements that toggled between two stable paths of moving fluid) to implement logic chips on postage-stamp sized devices. The idea had some technical merit but could not compete with electronics for building computers. I expect there is still some of this in specialized fields.

But if you could make liquid semiconductors, perhaps you could manipulate them using fluidics. The primary control operations would be done electronically, but fluidics would be used to adapt them to new configurations, or to make them self-repair. I see this possibility mostly for power control functions. If you burned out a power transistor, just flush out the material and replace it.

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